Tag Archives: faith

Before Goliath, a Lion & a Bear

David conquered a lion and a bear before he ever faced the greatest challenge of his lifetime – Goliath.

And prior to governing all of Egypt, Joseph ran Potiphar’s household.

Have you ever considered that previous battles in your own life were preceded by similar ones?  Battles that we survived and ones that we developed stronger faith through.

As I contemplate my own health challenges at the moment and my role as a health advocate for my daughter, Sarah, I am reminded that there were former struggles that prepared me for such a time as this.

As I’ve mentioned previously, I used to take my father to all of his medical appointments and have helped him during his recovery on a number of occasions.  I am his medical power of attorney and have advocated for him countless times.

And, of course, being a parent of three children predisposes one to seeking the best treatment for another.

Prior to this, after the premature death of our mother twenty-three years ago, my younger sister and I became chief health advocates on behalf of our 98 year old grandmother.  (Yes, our maternal grandmother survived our mother by two and a half months!)

Life has a way of revolving in cycles, doesn’t it?  If you live long enough, cycles repeat themselves and you glean important lessons and wisdom.

I am thankful for the lessons of faith, courage, patience and compassion that I have learned over the years.  When we are facing the storms of life, it is very unpleasant and we look for the nearest exit.  But, if we keep our eyes focused on the God who calms the seas, our faith will grow and we will be stronger because of it.

When we were rear ended by a drunk driver in May 2014, I determined very early on that I would focus on the positives.  I was keenly aware that my children were watching my responses to the situation and that by highlighting the pain and negativity, it would only serve to prolong our healing process.

Sometimes we need to reframe a situation, to step back and focus on the unchanging truth of the Bible and God’s promises to be with us.

During difficult times, it is helpful to keep a “Thankfulness” journal.  It is hard to remain discouraged when we keep our sight on God’s blessings.

Each of us have much to be thankful for.  Sometimes it’s a matter of perspective.  We need to realize that while we may have needs and wants, most of us are more wealthy than a large percentage of the world.

Often, the feeling of being out of control is a seed of discouragement.  To counteract this, concentrate on what you can do to improve the situation.

Yes, you can’t change your spouse, but you can work on you.

Yes, you may not be able to avoid surgery, but you can occupy your mind with positive things in the meantime.

Yes, you can’t make the neighbor turn down their loud, obnoxious music, but you can turn on your favorite music and work on a hobby that brings you joy.

Yes, you can’t make your co-workers like you, but you can invest your efforts in being the best employee possible.

I’m not suggesting mind over matter.  I’m suggesting changing your focus/mind in order to change your reality and future.  Life’s realities often begin in the mind.

I am reminded of a story I heard a while back:

A lady who happened to be blind was being relocated to a new room in a retirement home.  A nurse asked her how she felt about this change as she was about to be taken to her new living quarters.  The blind lady replied, “Oh, I absolutely love it!”  The nurse was astounded.  How could you love it already?  The blind lady said, “I already made up my mind that it’s going to be wonderful.”

Her situation hadn’t changed.  She remained blind.  But she was not blind to the fact that she should have a positive mindset in order to be happy.  I think that’s where many of us flub up.  When bad things happen, instead, we tend to focus on all the negative things and lose sight of the possibilities of a positive outcome.

So, if you find yourself in a raging battle today, friend, remember that, “This too shall pass.”

I think that’s another fallacy we often believe.  Life is ever changing.  Bad things come and go.  Good things come and go.  Ebbs and flows.

We will be in a better position to face today’s battle if we remember, like the Israelites did in the Old Testament, all of the previous battles along with their lessons.  They would build monuments in the desert where God performed miracles in previous battles.  We, too, should do the same.  Remind ourselves that the same God who delivered before, will again, deliver us!

“Then they cried unto the Lord in their trouble, and he delivered them out of their distresses.”

 ~ Psalm 107:6

 

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I did 20 Years…and so did he

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A rather persistent, mutual friend insisted that I meet “this guy” that would be just perfect for me.  I brushed her off a couple times as I’d recently come out of a hurtful relationship and besides I preferred things to happen naturally.  Nonetheless, I humored her and agreed that she could give “this guy” my phone number.

He called and in a matter of a few conversations, we fell in love.  We had many subsequent, lengthy phone calls in the evenings after work.  Each of us couldn’t wait for the next time we could speak!  I agreed to attend a Christian concert with him and some other mutual friends.  After the concert, we all went out to eat.  I was starving.  Literally, I could hear the acids in my stomach raging but I was too nervous to eat.  I opted just to have a Coke and upon “this guy’s” insistence, a few of his fries.  I was so hungry, yet I wouldn’t eat.  Ah, young love.  Well, we talked all night and our love story was sealed that June evening.

We were engaged on Christmas Day and married the following June, 20 years ago.

What is the secret of staying married until death do you part?

I like the quote I’ve seen around, “We were born in a time when divorce was not an option.”

or this one:

“I was born in a time when if something was broken, you fixed it.”

There’s something to those sayings.  It’s called removing the option of giving up, of throwing in the proverbial towel, and pushing up your sleeves and working on it.  A little elbow grease.  Effort.

Marriage is hard work.

There are no two ways around it.  But did you ever have a relationship that wasn’t?  We are all enshrined in this flesh called humanity, and as such, we have tendencies of failure.  We also have huge capacities to love.

And in my Bible it says that love conquers all.

Love hopes.  Love keeps no record of wrongs.  Love does not boast.  Love places the other before self.

That’s what love looks like.

Yes, love is hugs, kisses and all the physical trappings that accompany the marriage relationship and make it one of the most beautiful unions.

Sometimes life requires more than mere hugs and kisses.

Sometimes it demands forgiveness, forbearance, time, selflessness.

The demands of family, work, finances can be absolutely draining.  And sometimes one can feel like you have nothing left to give.  There are certainly seasons like that, especially when the kids are young.

We are happily at the stage now where our kids are nearly grown.  The two younger ones at home are 16 and 18.  Our oldest left home quite a few years ago and is 27.  So, the physical demands on us are fewer than they were years ago.  But during the years of great demand, that’s when dating your spouse really is important.  Carving out “couple time” is crucial to staying on the same page emotionally.

Twenty years now.  This June it will be 21 years!  God sure has been faithful to us.  We’ve weathered some fierce storms, times when throwing in the towel sure had its appeal.  If we succumbed to giving up, we would have forfeited the most precious love we share today.

When we were newlyweds, our euphoric love seemed incredible – like Fourth of July fireworks!  We thought it couldn’t get any better than this!  We were so young and naive.  Weathering the storms of life together creates an undeniable bond and deeper love than one could have imagined.

Am I thankful for the storms?  Well, maybe I am.  Strange as that sounds.  Without them, I would not have seen the sweet expression of love and care when my husband has brought me soup when I’ve been ill.  Without the challenges, we wouldn’t realize how desperately we needed one another.  Without the adversities, we would not know the grace and mercy of God as displayed through the other.

You know, friends, when we love our spouses, we are honoring God.  And when God is honored, there are blessings!

One of the most meaningful things my husband and I do together is pray.  When our hearts are overwhelmed, we invoke God’s presence and power into our lives.  When our hearts are full of thankfulness and joy, we express that, too, in prayer.  God is such a vital part of our relationship and He has always been.  I encourage you to pray with your spouse if possible.  God truly honors the unity of prayer.

Not only that, but I believe there is power in prayer.  Sometimes the most spiritual prayer is – “Help!”   God is close to the brokenhearted, my friend.

My husband and I are testaments of God’s grace and His power at work in our hearts.  The beauty of being married for a while is that before long, you know the other’s heart.  My husband knows what I will and will not do and vice versa.  Our hearts trust the other.

So, love begets trust.  And like a garden.  If left untilled, weeds will grow.  Don’t neglect your most precious relationship.

The grass is not greener on the other side.  There are weeds over there.  Till your own garden and your marriage will flourish.

What you invest in, you will reap the harvest.  Invest well.

 

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My Recent ER Visit

I had my Land’s End red, flannel pajamas on and had settled in for a long winter’s night. My blue eyes had been asleep for about an hour and woke up as my husband was brushing his teeth, preparing to go to bed himself.

A gnawing pain in my abdomen grabbed my attention, along with the fact that I was now shivering uncontrollably.  And it wasn’t because I was cold.  It seemed my body was really going through something.  I wrestled within myself as to whether or not I should go to the emergency room.  I really didn’t want to go.  However, my then 17 year old daughter just had an appendectomy last year and I was worried it may be my appendix!

My husband discarded his green and blue plaid, flannel pajamas for jeans and we proceeded to the hospital at 12:30 a.m.  I had to literally hold my jaw closed on the ride there just so my teeth wouldn’t keep chattering.  I had never had anything like this to happen before.  I’m the healthy one.  I generally don’t get sick.  Mom has to stay strong for the rest of the bunch, right?

Fortunately, once I completed the necessary registration paperwork, the nurse called me back to triage.  It was pretty miraculous that the waiting room was completely empty!  From there, once she took my vitals, she got me situated in a room in the ER.  She had me change into the hospital gown, which, by the way, is entirely frustrating to wrestle with!  Upon shifting in the bed, this gown literally could choke you.  I pondered a better design…maybe an elastic neckline?  After all, the patient is already encumbered by a plastic tube in their arm, otherwise known as an i.v.

The cheery nurse brought me morphine for the pain and a medication for the nausea. Interestingly enough, despite the morphine, I could still feel the pain.

My poor husband was restlessly attempting to nap on two, hard chairs beside my bed in the midst of all the circus.  I don’t know if he ever got more than two winks.  He was up all night and still went to work!  I felt so bad for him and prayed for strength.

It took a couple hours before the doctor came in and then more waiting for my blood work to come back.  Depending on the results, she would order an MRI if it was my gallbladder or a CT Scan if it was my appendix.  I was also feeling nauseated, so I think everyone concluded it was likely my appendix.  I even was preparing myself mentally for the possibility of having emergency surgery.

Around 4 a.m. the male tech wheeled me down to radiology to have a CT Scan.  The nice tech noted that we shared the same birthday.  He injected a dye in my i.v. for the scan and I forgot the odd sensation one receives along with that.  Glad when it was over.

Well, we finally got the news from the doctor that it was, in fact, not my appendix.  Everything looked fine.  For a split second, I felt a little silly there, laying on the hospital gurney, having abdominal pain for nothing.  Until the doctor explained…

There were some “incidental” things noted on the CT Scan.  For one, apparently I possess a “fatty liver”.  I thought there must be some mistake.  I don’t drink, never have.  It’s called “Non-alcoholic fatty liver” and from what I’ve subsequently read, 1 in 4 Americans have it.  They likely just don’t know.  It’s when more than 5-10% of your liver is fatty.  The heartening news is that it is completely reversible through proper diet, lots of vegetables.  But it can take over three years to rehabilitate.  Untreated, it can lead to sclerosis of the liver, which can lead to liver failure.  Well, that’s good news in the wee hours of the morning, isn’t it?

I thought I was having appendicitis… But, wait, there’s more …

I also have Diverticulosis, small holes in my colon.  If those holes become infected, then it becomes Diverticulitis.  Both, not good.  But, with a proper diet, can be treated.  Well, looks like a more stringent diet is on my horizon…  But, wait, there’s still more for this 45 year old body…

Gee, apparently, I’m not as healthy as I thought!  Ironically, despite the fact that I am overweight, I eat very healthy.  Probably the most healthy I ever have.  My now 18 year old daughter preaches, lives and breathes healthy living to all of us.  How can I not?  No, the truth is, because I lost my Mom to breast cancer when I was 23, I have been on a quest for optimum health ever since.  But, I digress…

So, the third bit of good news this ER doctor shared was that I have a sizable fibroid tumor.  Upon further research online, this explains so many other symptoms I’ve been experiencing, but I had no idea.

So, I have three doctor’s appointments scheduled for next week: the G.I. Dr., my primary care physician and the GYN.  I’m looking forward to having many questions answered.

My husband and two children have been wonderful, taking care of me as I try to rest in bed.  Even my daughter, who has POTS, has made hot tea for me and brought me snacks when she’s up to it.  Today is not a good day for her, so hubby and my son are filling in.

Now that I’ve given hubby instructions on how to operate the dishwasher, he loads and our son unloads.  Last night, the kids collaborated on dinner.  Part of the time I heard fussing and the other part was mutual laughter.  It’s always interesting how things come together when mom is out of commission.  I call them kids but they are 16 and 18.  I’m thankful they both know their way around the kitchen very well and are very kind and thoughtful.

I’m so thankful for my family, for good health care, for our home and for the hope that I have in God.  The hope that He is with me every step of the way, even if that includes upcoming surgery.  He is a God who walks beside me and that gives me great comfort.  I also know that He is working ALL things together for my good and His glory!  I will not fear the future, but will rest in knowing that God is already there, for He transcends all time and space.  Nothing catches Him by surprise.  And all my days are planned by Him.

 

 

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Being a Healthcare Advocate

An advocate is one who stands in place for another, who fights for another.

I am Sarah’s greatest health advocate.  Sarah is my 18 year old daughter who was recently diagnosed with POTS.  (I wrote a lengthy post on this that you can check out if you’d like.)

I suppose being a mother predisposes one to being an advocate.  After all, no one wants what’s best for their child more than their mother.  I have become a “Mama Grisly Bear” when it comes to my daughter.  My further training in this regard came in recent years, caring for my aging father.  He particularly has needed an advocate during doctor visits and his hospitalization several years ago when he survived sepsis.  I told him then that I would always be his best advocate and I meant it.  I still am.

In recent months my role as “Health advocate” has expanded to include my teenage daughter, Sarah, who has seen more specialists than one can imagine over the last year.

Last October I became convinced that my daughter’s symptoms matched those of patients with Lyme disease.  In fact, I was pretty sure she had it.  Of course, I have no formal medical training (unless you count being a nurse’s daughter).  🙂  I read articles online and really researched this.  I spoke with friends about it and they, too, were fairly convinced.

So, when we met with Sarah’s new primary care doctor, we strongly requested her being tested for Lyme.  And not just any old test.  We had read that the Western Blot test was the most accurate and that was what we wanted.

Not only did her PC order the Western Blot test, but also ordered another Leukemia round of blood tests as well as any markers in her blood indicating other diseases.  We were glad she was so proactive in ordering these tests but were sent on another emotional roller coaster while we awaited the results once more.  Thankfully, all results were negative!

Because Sarah has seen so many specialists, we always type up a “Medical History” information sheet, which is typically several pages long and includes all recent MRI’s and CAT scans and other diagnostic testing.  I also photocopy all recent lab work results so they know instantly what she’s already been tested for at a glance.

I’m sure some smile at this and perhaps think my efforts are “over the top”, but most thank me wholeheartedly for doing this.  It eliminates many questions and saves their time so they can concentrate on the bigger picture.  It also means we do not have to answer the same questions over and over again, specialist to specialist visit.

Part of being a patient advocate is steering the treatment in the direction you are most comfortable.  Example: Our family tries to eat very healthy and veers toward a more holistic path when possible.  We’re not opposed to medications, but only when necessary and if a supplement couldn’t work just as well.  I am reminded of this because several doctors have suggested birth control for Sarah as a treatment for a couple different issues (that have nothing to do with birth control itself actually).  Sarah has done some research into this drug and is adamantly opposed to using it.  I have to say that I am not a fan either and wouldn’t want that necessarily for her.  My mother died at age 53 of breast cancer and studies have shown increased estrogen levels lead to breast cancer.

Each time we have politely declined using it, both doctors were certainly understanding, which we appreciated.  (I had a doctor years ago discharge me as his patient because I refused to go on a steroid because we were trying to conceive at the time.  So some doctors believe it is their way or the highway, apparently.)

Side note:  Sarah wanted to be a midwife for a while and during that time, educated herself greatly in every aspect.  She even was able to attend a home birth, which was a memorable experience for her.

So, you might say I am a Captain of the Healthcare Sea on my daughter’s behalf, in a way.  Obviously, my daughter’s care is ultimately up to her doctors, but if I believe a leaf needs turned over, I will advocate for it.  Steering is definitely a part of being a good advocate.  So is educating yourself on the symptoms and known diagnosis.  Don’t be afraid to speak up.  In this case, it’s my daughter’s body that we are dealing with.  She may be a stranger to the specialist, but to me, she is a huge part of my world!  And my heart.

At the end of the day, I must know within myself that I’ve exhausted every avenue in an attempt to restore my daughter’s health.  I feel like I’m fighting a battle for her wellness and recovery.   One on one time with each doctor is very limited, so having medical history documented and any questions written down is vital for a successful visit.  It also eliminates “brain fog” during the visit.  It’s an amazing thing that happens when you’re finally face to face with the doctor, often after months of waiting to get in, and then all pertinent questions fly out the window.  Another thing that happens is, whatever the doctor says during the visit winds up becoming a “brain blur” afterward.  I recommend writing notes, asking questions and later documenting the visit for clarity.

I am present during every doctor visit my daughter has, even now that she has turned 18.  She’ll say that sometimes I answer the doctor’s questions and that she wished I would allow her time to do that.  So, I’ve scaled back and attempted to allow her to do most of the talking when possible.  Often what happens is that she experiences POTS “brain fog” and goes on bunny trails in response to the doctor’s questions, which can be confusing and time consuming.  And each visit is so key to Sarah’s recovery that I feel like much is at stake and we must make the most of our time.  So, I speak up when I think it’s useful to the doctor’s understanding of her symptoms.  Sarah thanks me.  Most of the time.  😉

Follow up is another major component of advocacy.  It has been amazing to me the degree that I have had to involve myself and relentless messages to doctor’s offices in order to obtain lab or other diagnostic testing results.  It matters to no one more than you and your family.  Why wouldn’t you follow up?  If the doctor says the lab results should be ready in three days.  Guess who’s calling in three days?  Me!  The sooner we have the results, the sooner treatment and recovery can begin.

Have you ever had to be a staunch advocate for a loved one who is ill?  If so, can you offer any sage words of advice?

 

{Medical Disclaimer:  I am not a doctor.  I don’t even play one on t.v.  I am a mom.  A very loving and dedicated one at that.  The information contained in this blog and any other article on my page are based on our experiences, what we’ve read and our opinions or understanding of POTS.  Please consult a licensed physician for advice and conduct extensive research on your own.}

 

 

 

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P.O.T.S. & Our Struggle

You may ask, “What is POTS?”  It’s an acronym for Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, a disorder of the autonomic nervous system.  This medical term was coined in 1993, however has been around for hundreds of years under other names.

Our world changed last August when our daughter, Sarah, (17 at the time) began experiencing seemingly random, debilitating symptoms.  Her symptoms began as daily migraines, feeling like she’d pass out, severe fatigue, sleep disturbances, joint pain, muscle twitches and g.i. issues.  They have now evolved into cardiac symptoms, such as heart palpitations and heart racing even when at rest, brain fog, memory issues, slower speech and being primarily home bound.

Before I go any further, let me back up the train to state what I think were contributing factors to our daughter contracting POTS.  If you’ve read my blog, you may recall our family was hit by a drunk driver back in May 2014.  We were involved in a traumatic 4 car accident at a red light and rear ended at about 70 mph.  We all endured four months of physical therapy subsequently.

Sarah had an appendectomy in February 2015 and then had all four wisdom teeth extracted in August 2015.  We also moved five states away and Sarah was under pressure to perform well on her ACT test.  It has been said that surgery and major stress on the body can be triggers.  I definitely believe this to be true.

She’d been seeing her primary care doctor regularly post appendectomy, primarily to address her raised white blood cell counts, who referred us to a hematologist to further investigate.  We saw the hematologist a number of times, who referred us to a neurologist concerning Sarah’s massive headaches.  During this time, she was tested for Leukemia, Lymphoma and other markers in the blood that may indicate disease.  I cannot tell you the intense stress our family endured waiting for the blood results when a hematologist is concerned about potentially deadly diseases for your child.  Our stress level was off the charts.  We are strong believers in God’s healing power and the fact that He walks beside us, but our faith was greatly tested and tried during these hours.  It wouldn’t be the last time either.

Praise the Lord, those tests came back negative!!  While we were greatly relieved, it still remained a mystery as to why Sarah’s white blood cell counts and lymphocytes were elevated beyond a normal range.  Our hearts and prayers go out to the parents whose children are battling cancer and other diseases.  It is the worst feeling in the world for your child to be sick and you can’t do anything to make him/her better.  But pray.  And pray we did.  Sarah is on so many prayer lists at so many churches.  Our friends and family have remained faithful in prayer on her behalf and for that, we are ever grateful.  We are convinced that it is due to their prayers that we were sustained during the darkest of hours.

In September 2015, the neurologist diagnosed Sarah with POTS and prescribed Florinef.  As with any new diagnosis, we were overwhelmed with questions.  So, we studied.  Between Sarah and I, I’m pretty sure we could write a small book.  Sarah is a bright girl and curious by nature, so she immersed herself in articles online.

The Florinef helped a great deal in the beginning, but by November and December, Sarah’s symptoms were worsening by the day it seemed.   I felt like I’d lost my baby girl.  Sarah turned 18 in November and could hardly make it out of bed for dinner.  This was our new reality.

She would have begun attending the community college in September 2015 but was not well enough to do so.  She wants to become a nurse, which I think suits her personality and gifts very well.  We’re looking forward to the day she can begin classes.

We switched primary care doctors after we received news that her former doctor was no longer participating with any insurance.  She saw the new PC in early November, who referred us to a GI doctor for her stomach issues as well as a cardiologist for the racing heart symptoms.  By now, our heads are just spinning because we’ve seen more doctors in 2015 than imaginable!

We saw the GI doctor who recommended a colonoscopy and upper endoscopy, so she had that done at the end of November.  The results were very good.

Side note:  Sarah eats a very clean diet and is very disciplined.  She’ll be the first to say not to applaud her too much on that note because she does so more so out of necessity than discipline.  She knows what upsets her stomach and which foods sit well and has learned over the years to adjust accordingly.  Sarah primarily drinks water and occasionally herbal tea.

We finally saw the cardiologist (took a while to get in with this pediatric cardiologist) last week.  I finally feel like we are on a good path!!  Praise the Lord for that!  Because Sarah’s symptoms revolve greatly around the tachycardia, I believe the cardiologist is in the best position to treat her at the moment.  He prescribed Atenolol (which, ironically, my father also takes…for other reasons, of course) to regulate her heart and after being on that for 6 days now, I have to say, it has helped greatly!  She is able to get out of the bed more and I feel like we’re getting our Sarah back.  It isn’t a miracle drug, however.  She still feels the extreme fatigue and other symptoms, but it has helped the tachycardia (rapid heart rate).

Sarah is still unable to do much of anything, aside from lay around and fix her meals.  Part of the treatment for POTS is to increase salt intake and water consumption.  So, she does that.  Even prior to the diagnosis, she drank a lot of water.  She drinks probably 2-3 times the amount she used to.  The reason for the larger salt intake is it helps to increase blood volume and blood pressure, which aids in treating the symptoms.  The underlying issue with POTS is lack of blood flow, which is why she often feels like she will pass out.  (lack of blood flow to the brain)  This is also why she feels so poorly after eating.  Apparently, after you eat, your system is hard at work digesting and diverts extra blood flow to the digestive system.  This is terrible for POTS patients as they need all the blood flow they can get under normal circumstances.  Sarah would have to promptly lay down after eating and fight not to pass out.  As if the symptoms could not worsen, a woman’s monthly cycle exacerbates  the situation.  Again, it all goes back to blood flow and its affects on the entire body.

Because POTS is a disease of the autonomic nervous system, it affects all the body’s systems one cannot control, such as: sleep, heart rate, digestion, respiratory, etc.  In the beginning, we questioned how Sarah could be experiencing the myriad of symptoms she was.  I must admit, I often thought she was a hypochondriac and we tired of hearing about all of her woes.  What a blessing it was to receive the diagnosis, so then we could work toward treatment and hopefully her full recovery one day.  We have heard that others with this illness go undiagnosed for years and that is heartbreaking.

Where are we now?

The cardiologist referred Sarah for physical therapy, which was a godsend!  Physical exercise is very useful.  Strengthening of abdominal and leg muscles is beneficial to the POTS patient because it helps the body effectively and efficiently pump blood upward toward the brain.

Sarah begins meeting with a sports therapist this week and we will keep you posted.  Sadly, she strained her wrist while exercising last week and has it wrapped in an ace bandage, applies Arnicare gel regularly and soaks it in Epsom salt.  Hopefully, she’ll be okay to do the therapy.

One of Sarah’s POTS’ symptoms is “exercise intolerance” and that means that if she exercises, it can wipe her out for days afterward.  It’s awful.  Even a short walk exhausts her for days.  So, the idea with the therapy is to build her tolerance slowly.

I plan on writing further about POTS and how Sarah is doing, so check back for updates if you’d like.  Do you know anyone with POTS?  They say over 500,000 Americans have it.  Not sure how accurate that really is since often it goes undiagnosed.  Many doctors have no clue as to what it is.  How can one expect a diagnosis if they have no knowledge of it?

We covet your prayers for Sarah – that the Lord will touch her body and restore her health.

We know God has great, big plans for her!

 

{Medical Disclaimer:  I am not a doctor.  I don’t even play one on t.v.  I am a mom.  A very loving and dedicated one at that.  The information contained in this blog and any other article on my page are based on our experiences, what we’ve read and our opinions or understanding of POTS.  Please consult a licensed physician for advice and conduct extensive research on your own.}

 

 

 

 

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Lessons from the French

So, I’ve become a bit addicted to YouTube videos of late.  It seems watching skin care videos led to French expert skin care videos, which led to French culture videos.  Do you ever do that?  One video topic leads to another?

I’ve been fascinated by some aspects of the French culture and wanted to share my musings with you.

Here are my top 4:

1.) Learn to enjoy small things in small quantities.

In America, we tend to “Super Size” everything.  The bigger, the better.  We could take a tip from the French and learn to enjoy small portions and let that be enough.  This goes beyond food as well and could be applied to many areas of our lives.  Simplicity is a good thing.

2.) Take your time to be graceful and grateful.

Stop and smell the roses.  Speak to people you come in contact with.  Treat them like real people.  I think too often we become engrossed in technology that we can neglect adding real value to those around us.  When we slow our “merry-go-round” down just a little, we are free to focus on our many blessings and be grateful instead of the discontentment we often feel.

3.) Invest in yourself.  You will then be able to love others better.

This thought occurred to me as I was watching skin care videos.  If we do not properly care for ourselves and overlook our own needs, we are selling ourselves short.  For one thing, when our needs are met, we feel nourished and cared for.  When our “love tank” is full, we can then impart more love in those around us.  When we care for ourselves, we are investing in our future as well.  I am reminded of the Scripture:

“Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.”  ~ Matthew 22:39

4.) Focus on the important things.

So often we worry about every little thing and lose sight of the big picture.  Modern lifestyles are so complex.  If we are not careful, trivial things and time wasters can consume our lives.  We must be deliberate about what we allow to attract our attention.  Focus on your goals, living out your faith and making a difference in this world.

 

I hope you enjoyed my musings.  Tell me your thoughts.  I’d love to hear them.

Have a beautiful day, friends!

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Life in Transition…

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We’ve made our big move … 1,000 miles south to the Sunshine State!  We’ve been here in the land of the perpetual vacation for six weeks now and are glad to be back!  We lived here for a decade before, so this is not a totally new experience.  We are currently renting a 1,500 square foot apartment, which is very nice, I must say.  It is, however, much smaller than our former 2,600 square foot home.  It has three bedrooms and two baths, so there’s plenty of space in theory.  It’s just that we haven’t rented an apartment in 16 years!  Our two teens (ages 15 and 17) will be very glad to transition into a house, that’s for sure.  The interesting (and sometimes annoying layout) of our apartment is the 17 steps we have to walk up to get to our living space once you enter our front door!  When you have lots of bags of groceries, this becomes a little cumbersome.  You have to really want to come up or down to actually put forth the energy to do so! Haha!      

One of the criteria in finding a suitable apartment was that it must have an attached garage to house all of our “stuff”!  Well, this one does and, oh my goodness, is it ever jam packed!  Despite selling and giving away furniture and household items, and being forced to leave behind furniture that wouldn’t fit in the Uhaul, we managed to pack a 26 foot Uhaul pulling an additional trailer.  I honestly don’t know how we had so much, but somehow it accumulates over the years!  It boggles the mind considering I’m a consistent purger and organizer.  We managed to pack our little garage here as tight as possible and have only opened the door a handful of times!  Don’t open the door!  🙂  Something may fall out!  Haha!  

We have put an offer on a house so we’ll see if that works out.  It’s a nice, three bedroom house with a pool, which we’re all excited about!  I, for one, am looking forward to the daily exercise.  My husband and I are downsizing a bit and nearing the empty nest stage so we don’t want a large house.  We’re really trying to reduce monthly expenses and concentrate on the things that really count.  While three bedrooms will be smaller than what we’re accustomed to, the total square footage of the home is 2,300.  So, it’s not a tiny house and it has an office space, which my husband will be required to share with his quilter/scrapper wife!  😉  Concessions must be made.  Haha!   Most of the houses we’ve seen are 4 bedrooms, so we’ll see what we wind up with.  It would be nice to have that extra room.

The one constant in our lives is the homeschooling train continues its journey down the track.  Our 17 year old daughter will graduate in May and our 15 year old son will complete 9th grade.  That is the blessing of learning at home … there’s no new school or peer group to adjust to.  We’ve already located a very nice library and have our handy, dandy tickets (or library cards) to “free resources paid by our tax dollars”.   Our daughter is all registered to take the ACT test in the spring so she has been studying the big prep book for that.  She’s a smart cookie, so she should do very well.  Just a decade ago, we were walking this road with our older son, our first homeschool graduate!  I remember thinking on the night of his graduation, that I finally felt confident that I could do “this”!  And, so we have!  … I should be graduating any day now…. 😉      

Last Sunday we visited the fourth or fifth church since moving here and I think we all have decided it’s a keeper!  So, thankfully, we will visit this church again this Sunday!  We all really liked the way the pastor integrated so much Scripture and stories from both the Old and the New Testaments, and made it so compelling and relevant to our lives.  He held even my teen’s interest with his great articulation, sense of humor and delivery.  We liked the praise and worship and it’s somewhat close by.  All in all, a win-win for our family!  And, here I was about to give up hope…      

Transition is tough but this time around, it hasn’t been bad at all.  I think the reason for that is that God truly ordained this move and living closer to our grown son makes it all so very worth it!  We have probably seen our older son 15-20 times over the last 6 weeks, which is more than we’ve seen him over the last 5 years!!  Can you imagine the joy that resonates within this mother’s heart?!  And when he texts asking about a favorite recipe….Ah, it does a mother’s heart good!    

We all cannot wait to be finally settled, reunited with our boxes in the garage and make “heads or tails” of the things that made the 1,000 mile trek!  It’s so close we can taste it now…But, not quite!  Patience…

Life in transition continues, but before long, this quilter will have a rotary cutter in one hand and a piece of cotton in the other.  Such joy awaits!

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